CHAN ZUCKERBERG INITIATIVE AWARDS $1 MILLION GRANT TO CTTL
Nov
14
1:00 PM13:00

CHAN ZUCKERBERG INITIATIVE AWARDS $1 MILLION GRANT TO CTTL

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative has awarded a $1 million grant to the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning to expand online access in the U.S. and across the globe to Neuroteach Global, an online professional development experience developed by the CTTL that uses the Talented micro-learning platform to deliver research-informed strategies in Mind, Brain and Education Science in the most innovative way to date.

"We count on teachers to prepare our students for the world of the future, so we believe they should be equipped with cutting-edge tools and information about how young people learn," CZI said on their Facebook page. "That’s why we’re proud to be joining the Omidyar Group in supporting The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning (CTTL) at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Potomac, Maryland. 


"(Neuroteach Global) offers an online professional development resource for teachers to translate learning science and neurological research into strategies that allow them to meet every students’ individual needs — in a format aligned to the science of how people learn."

Through the Neuroteach Global web-based app, teachers and school leaders translate the latest evidence on how students learn into classroom practice. Neuroteach Global also enables teachers and school leaders to benefit from the same training that every teacher at St. Andrew’s receives through the CTTL, while also receiving feedback on how they have integrated these lessons into their pedagogy.

The goals of Neuroteach Global are to support teachers as they improve their craft by enhancing their understanding of MBE Science and improve outcomes for all students.
The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative’s $1,000,000 grant is in addition to this fall’s $625,000 grant from the Omidyar Group toward this effort. Read more about Neuroteach Global by reading this Education Week blog or this Education Dive brief.

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CTTL Receives $15K Grant from Pathway2Tomorrow
Nov
9
2:30 PM14:30

CTTL Receives $15K Grant from Pathway2Tomorrow

The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning was one of 24 organizations throughout the United States to receive $15,000 stipend to help support the build of Neuroteach Global and to create access for public, charter, and private school teachers to this virtual micro-learning platform that delivers the Science of Learning to educators through a digital device of their choosing.

Read more about the award winners at, http://p2tomorrow.org/

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Two SAES teachers to present at researchED conference in Philadelphia
Oct
25
10:00 AM10:00

Two SAES teachers to present at researchED conference in Philadelphia

Math teachers Karen Kaufman and John McMillen will present at this weekend’s researchED conference in Philadelphia, sharing their experience reinventing how they introduce and cover their course content.

Based in the United Kingdom, researchED convenes conferences around the world that bring researchers, educators, and policy makers together to bridge the gap between research and practice.

Over the past two years, Kaufman and McMillen have taken Mind, Brain, and Education Science research on memory and applied it to how math classes are taught at St. Andrew’s. On Saturday they’ll discuss how St. Andrew’s teachers introduced spaced repetition by assigning students weekly review packets throughout the school year.

Kaufman said she was inspired to incorporate spaced repetition into her teaching after learning about Ebbinghaus’s “forgetting curve,” which suggests that the greatest decline in memory occurs within the first days or even hours of learning a new topic. She quickly realized this phenomenon explained why her students were surprised by what they saw on her final exam review packets.

“I felt like the year went great, and then I put down the final exam review packet and just waited,” she said. “Every year, students would say, ‘Is this on the final? Did we ever learn this?’”

Kaufman ensured each topic covered in a class appeared in the weekly review packets, and the result was transformative, she said.

“If you do a few problems a night, if you stick with this, it’s going to make the difference at the end of the year,” she told her students. “At the end of the year I handed out my (final exam) review packet. The kids looked through it, and said, ‘Wait, this is all that’s on our final?”

Kaufman and McMillen will share examples of the review packets as well as “The List,” which indicates what math concepts and skills students should know before they begin a new course. The List has also inspired a new approach to summer work; rather than give students specific math problems to solve, they are instructed to look at The List for their class and use an online tool like IXL or Khan Academy to practice skills that need review.

“We don’t dictate summer work – the kids determine their summer work,” McMillen said.

Teachers do not yet have quantitative data to show the impact of these changes, but Kaufman said she has seen the difference in how students approach their math classes.

“They all felt really good – good going into the final, good leaving it – and I feel the kids going through these courses who are used to this constant review have a stronger algebraic foundation,” she said. “I think it’s doable (for teachers). It’s not easy, but if kids leave a course and feel more confident, then it’s worth it.”

Glenn Whitman, Dean of Studies and Director of the CTTL, invited Kaufman and McMillen to present with him at researchED. He called them “models of the journey of the research-informed teacher” and said he believes they will inspire attending teachers and school leaders to bring research into practice.

“They are veterans who are already highly successful with their students, but they saw the opportunity to leverage research to embed their rich mathematical content for the longer term using how much more we know about memory and how the student brain learns,” Whitman said.

McMillen said he hopes the researchED audience comes away with the confidence to jump into implementing new teaching ideas, knowing that some strategies may not work out.

“This is the course of the journey…you have to be willing to be wrong and you have to be willing to change where you were wrong,” he said. “The school has provided us the freedom to try, to take some research and implement it and see how it turns out.”

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CTTL AWARDED GRANT FROM OMIDYAR GROUP
Sep
25
2:00 AM02:00

CTTL AWARDED GRANT FROM OMIDYAR GROUP

The Center for Transformative Teaching & Learning at St. Andrew’s (the CTTL) has received a grant from the Omidyar Group to fund the expansion of Neuroteach Global, an online professional development platform that will provide time and cost-effective training in Mind, Brain, and Education Science strategies.

Neuroteach Global was developed as a pilot program earlier this year with a goal to empower teachers and school leaders across the country and around the world to translate neuro-educational research into classroom practice. This recent grant from the Omidyar Group will support the build of the the 4-Level, 24 Microcourse training platform. Once fully built, Neuroteach Global will enable the CTTL to train significantly more teachers and school leaders than it can currently reach. The Omidyar Group’s grant will total up to $625,000 over three years, assuming the CTTL and Neuroteach Global reach certain benchmarks.

“Once again, the Omidyar Group has inspired the CTTL to explore the next frontier in bringing Mind, Brain, and Education Science to teachers and school leaders around the world,” said Glenn Whitman, Director of the CTTL. “We have developed a first-of-its kind virtual professional development tool that will help close the teacher quality, student achievement and student well-being gap. This has the potential to impact thousands of educators and tens of thousands of students worldwide.”

The support originated from St. Andrew’s alumnus Pierre Omidyar ‘84 and his wife Pam. The Omidyar Group supports a diverse set of investments and activities geared toward uncovering new models of education to improve student outcomes. The Omidyars have long been supportive of the CTTL's goal to make training opportunities for teachers available on a global scale.

The CTTL is the only pre-collegiate school-based research center in the United States that designs and provides MBE Science and research-informed professional development programming to public, charter and private schools as well as Teach For America (Washington, D.C., region). Since its founding in 2011, the CTTL has attracted foundation support from the Crimsonbridge Foundation, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, E.E. Ford Foundation, CityBridge Foundation, and Windover Foundation, among others. The CTTL has trained teachers at more than 100 schools in 20 states and five countries. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School serves as the CTTL’s incubator for new programming, resources, and educational tools.

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The CTTL training for The Gunston School featured in The Bay Times
Sep
7
8:00 AM08:00

The CTTL training for The Gunston School featured in The Bay Times

This September, the CTTL worked with Teachers from The Gunston School in Centerville, MD. This training was featured in The Bay Times.

https://www.myeasternshoremd.com/qa/community/schools/teachers-practice-brain-friendly-skills/article_947b04e2-d6dc-5555-bf45-2b967530ac5c.html

Excerpt from The Bay Times:

“CENTREVILLE — Seeking to fully align the school’s teaching and learning environment with best practices in neuro-education, Gunston has partnered with the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning for a series of professional development workshops.

“One of the most exciting developments in the field of education has been the broad acknowledgement that every student brings a high degree of individual neurodiversity into the classroom,” noted Gunston’s Head of School, John Lewis. “This understanding, coupled with the ever-improving research and understanding regarding how brain-friendly teaching can enhance every student’s learning experience, continues to be a central priority for Gunston as a school.”

“As a school, we’ve always honored each child’s unique intellectual strengths, but our formal neurodiversity training began more than a decade ago with a series of All Kinds of Minds workshops,” continued Lewis. “However, CTTL’s unique expertise in how to translate Mind-Brain Education research into a rigorous, college-preparatory academic environment is the reason we’ve decided to partner with them.”

The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning, founded at St. Andrew’s School in Potomac, Maryland, is an international leader in the field of Mind, Brain and Education Science research to allow teachers to maximize their effectiveness and students to achieve their highest potential.

This past summer, a four-member delegation of Gunston’s faculty attended CTTL’s “Science of Teaching and School Leadership Academy”, and as a follow-up on Aug. 30, Glenn Whitman, CTTL’s Director and author of the best selling book “NeuroTeach,” spent a full day leading a hands-on workshop with Gunston’s full faculty. Whitman will return for a series of follow-up workshops over a two-year period.

“Our entire faculty has embraced this process,” said Christie Grabis, Gunston’s assistant head and academic program coordinator, “and all of our students will benefit from some of CTTL’s key areas of focus like academic mindset training, multi-modal instruction, the effective use of formative and summative assessments, the impact of the socio-emotional experience on learning, and the explicit teaching of metacognitive skills.”

“My work with CTTL has inspired my work as as teacher-researcher,” shared Dr. Mariah Goodall, a science and math teacher at Gunston, “and the integration of this research has transformed my daily classroom practices. Every day I come to school, I remind myself that teachers are brain changers!”

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CTTL Director & Head of Research Once Again Published In Academic Journal
Mar
16
11:00 AM11:00

CTTL Director & Head of Research Once Again Published In Academic Journal

3/9/2018 

Written by St. Andrew's Communications Staff

For the second time this week, St. Andrew’s teachers have published a paper in a prestigious academic journal. Dr. Ian Kelleher and Glenn Whitman had a paper accepted by the academic journal Mind, Brain, and Education.

Kelleher, the director of research for the Center for Transformative Teaching & Learning (CTTL), and Whitman, the director of the CTTL, also co-authored an article for Impact, a U.K. journal of the Chartered College of Teaching. That piece was published earlier this week.

Kelleher and Whitman’s article in Mind, Brain, and Education is titled “A Bridge No Longer Too Far: A Case Study of One School’s Exploration of the Promise and Possibilities of Mind, Brain, and Education Science for the Future of Education.”The six-page paper discusses St. Andrew’s journey, along with the CTTL, in becoming a model for integrating MBE Science into the pedagogy of the St. Andrew’s faculty and how other schools can replicate the model.

Mind, Brain, and Education is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal established in 2007 by Kurt Fischer of Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, the founding president of the International Mind, Brain, and Education Society. It is rare for Mind, Brain, and Education, or any journal for that matter, to publish a paper authored by teachers without university collaborators.

To read a pre-publication proof of the article from Mind, Brain, and Education[1], click here.

[1]Kelleher, I. and Whitman, G. (2018), A Bridge No Longer Too Far: A Case Study of One School's Exploration of the Promise and Possibilities of Mind, Brain, and Education Science for the Future of Education. Mind, Brain, and Education. doi:10.1111/mbe.12163

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St. Andrew's & CTTL Introduces New School Schedule
Feb
15
1:30 PM13:30

St. Andrew's & CTTL Introduces New School Schedule

St. Andrew's & CTTL Introduces New School Schedule

Letter written by SAES Head Of School, Robert Kosasky:

Over the past decade, St. Andrew's and our Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning have worked tirelessly to develop the most research-informed faculty in the country. Each day I watch these extraordinary educators unlock their students' potential with rigor, innovation, and joy.

This commitment to student-centered, research-based practice has led St. Andrew's to redesign the Postoak academic schedule for the 2018-2019 school year. Over the past 18 months, a task force of teachers and administrators has gathered input and research, along with feedback from students and parents, to determine how the flow of each school day can maximize student learning and well-being. Specifically, the task force prioritized:

  • Lengthening class periods beyond the current 40-minute standard to promote creative teaching and deep learning

  • Reducing the number of class periods per day (and therefore the number of homework assignments per evening) to promote focus and moderate the rushed tempo of school life

  • Increasing time for students to meet with teachers and their peers during the school day for academic enrichment and healthy socialization

  • Minimizing conflicts between class time and other important school activities, including assemblies, field trips, and athletic competitions

The result of this work is a new schedule that will continue to provide our students with a rigorous research-informed education that gives them time to pursue their passions and focus on their well-being.

Maximizing Learning Without Adding Stress

Middle and Upper School students will have four classes in a typical day with each class lasting 65 minutes. Research suggests that engaged, focused, deep learning requires longer class periods with fewer transitions during the school day and fewer, more meaningful homework assignments at night. Passing time between classes will be increased to 10 minutes. This creates more time for peer interaction and reflection, and a less stressful flow to the school day.

Intentional Time to Collaborate with Teachers and Peers

The schedule affords structured "office hours" several times a week for students to meet with teachers to receive individual enrichment and extra help, and allows for classes to be extended when necessary for science labs, studio art lessons, and other specialized learning. It also provides study hall for Middle School students. The schedule offers ample time for athletics, chapel, advisory, clubs, and assemblies without "borrowing" from academic periods, preserving essential teaching and learning time.

Time for Community-Building, Well-Being and Curiosity

As educators, one of the most exciting parts of the new schedule is Wednesday morning. That time is blocked off for assemblies and all-school chapels. But not every Wednesday in a trimester has a community gathering. On those days, that 65-minute block of time, which we are calling "Time by Design," can be used in a variety of ways, self-selected by our students. 

They can choose to tackle group work and projects, meet with clubs, find time to work with a teacher, brainstorm with their FIRST Robotics team, sign up to become a peer tutor, work on a passion project in the D!Lab, utilize the fitness center or even get to sleep earlier knowing they have an hour at the start of the day to complete homework assignments. There will be expanded programming for Intermediate School students on Wednesday mornings, allowing our youngest Postoak students to try new things and discover new passions. Buses will continue to run on the same schedule on those Wednesdays.

As a research-informed school, it is critical that we pilot this schedule before implementing it next year. The week of February 26 through March 2, students on the Postoak campus will live the new schedule with our current 8:30 a.m. start time. This will allow our administration the opportunity to implement the schedule seamlessly next fall, while showing our students the benefits of these longer classes, a benefit they advocated for throughout this process.

As a destination school for research-informed teaching and learning, we are so glad to take this next step in our evolution with you. We have no doubt that this new schedule will enhance our ability to know and inspire each child.

Robert Kosasky, Head of School, St. Andrew's Episcopal School

If you'd like to read some of the research that was utilized in creating the new schedule, please feel free to check out these articles:

Research on schedules

Well-being and time use

Why longer periods can lead to great teaching

A drive to set better homework

The importance of sleep

  • Rasch, B. & Born, J. About Sleep's Role in Memory. Physiological Reviews 93, 681-766, doi:10.1152/physrev.00032.2012 (2013).

Why face-to-face time is important for teachers and students

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Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Approves CTTL Grant
Jan
15
12:30 AM00:30

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Approves CTTL Grant

1/10/2018 

by St. Andrew's Communications Staff

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative has approved a grant to the CTTL and St. Andrew’s to help fund the CTTL’s pilot program of Neuroteach Global, an online professional development platform that delivers research-informed strategies in Mind, Brain, and Education Science. 

CZI’s goal “is to empower more teachers and school leaders to create learning environments that meet the unique needs, interests and learning preferences of each child while supporting them as a whole person – taking into account their physical, social and emotional development."

The CTTL seeks to enhance the foundational knowledge and skills of 100% of St. Andrew’s teachers, and teachers throughout the world, in the field of Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) science research. This pilot project, that will also include teachers at area public schools, is being supported by the grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

Last week, 12 teachers, representing all four of the divisions at St. Andrew’s, commenced playing two five-minute games that connect and extend their prior training and knowledge in how MBE science can be applied to teaching and learning in the Preschool through 12th-grade classroom. The games, accessed through an app developed specifically for this program, are informed by research on memory and Mark McDaniel, Peter Brown, and Henry Roediger’s book, Make It StickThe Science of Successful Learning. Mark was a faculty member of the CTTL’s Science of Teaching and School Leadership Academy during the summer of 2017.

Over a one-week period, St. Andrew’s teachers representing Science, Math, History, English, Visual Arts and Foreign Language will be completing an hours-worth of challenges that focus on “Making Learning Memorable.”

The CTTL’s Head of Research, Dr. Ian Kelleher, has been leading the design of this professional development tool in collaboration with Talented, a software development firm that the CTTL first met at SXSWedu, one of the most innovative education conferences in the world, led by St. Andrew’s alum Greg Rosenbaum ‘06.

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CTTL Pilots Neuroteach Global With St. Andrew's Teachers
Jan
9
11:00 AM11:00

CTTL Pilots Neuroteach Global With St. Andrew's Teachers

by St. Andrew's Communications Staff

The new year has brought new innovation from the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning at St. Andrew’s with the launch of Neuroteach Global, an online professional development platform that delivers research-informed strategies in Mind, Brain, and Education Science.

The CTTL seeks to enhance the foundational knowledge and skills of 100% of St. Andrew’s teachers, and teachers throughout the world, in the field of Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) science research. This pilot project, that will also include teachers at area public schools, is being supported by a grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

Last week, 12 teachers, representing all four of the divisions at St. Andrew’s, commenced playing two five-minute games that connect and extend their prior training and knowledge in how MBE science can be applied to teaching and learning in the Preschool through 12th-grade classroom. The games, accessed through an app developed specifically for this program, are informed by research on memory and Mark McDaniel, Peter Brown, and Henry Roediger’s book, Make It StickThe Science of Successful Learning. Mark was a faculty member of the CTTL’s Science of Teaching and School Leadership Academy during the summer of 2017.

Over a one-week period, St. Andrew’s teachers representing Science, Math, History, English, Visual Arts and Foreign Language will be completing an hours-worth of challenges that focus on “Making Learning Memorable.”

The CTTL’s Head of Research, Dr. Ian Kelleher, has been leading the design of this professional development tool in collaboration with Talented, a software development firm that the CTTL first met at SXSWedu, one of the most innovative education conferences in the world, led by St. Andrew’s alum Greg Rosenbaum ‘06.

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CTTL Launches First Science of Teaching & School Leadership Academy
Jul
30
to Jul 31

CTTL Launches First Science of Teaching & School Leadership Academy

More than 150 teachers and school leaders from more than 20 states and five countries discovered how they could bring Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) science research to their classrooms and schools at the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning’s first Science of Teaching and School Leadership Academy.


The Academy took place from July 23 to 27 at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Potomac, Md. Participants took a deep dive into research and strategies in how the brain learns, works, and thrives, and applied this new knowledge as they created action research plans they will bring to their schools in the fall.

“It’s been amazing, but we expected it to be amazing because we were not telling people what to do,” said Dr. Ian Kelleher, Director of Research for the CTTL. “We were giving them tools to help them work with their colleagues and kids, and that they would leave here feeling empowered with great content to make a difference.”

Participants heard from St. Andrew’s students, who shared how they learn during speed pitches; national leaders in MBE Science, including Dr. Daniel Willingham, Psychology Professor at University of Virginia and Author of Why Don't Students Like School?; and from education researchers during a Science in Action Day at Johns Hopkins University.

“Can we provide educators an amazing overview of research, where they can develop their own action plan?” said Dr. Kelly Fisher, the Executive Director of the Science of Learning Institute at Johns Hopkins. “It’s unheard of. We’ve never seen anything like this before. This shows it is possible, and through this partnership it has happened.”

Several participants said they were excited to apply their new knowledge of MBE science, such as growth mindset and learning strategies, when they return to their students. Participant Hadiza Gidado, who came from Nigeria and trains teachers in Africa through the Discovery Learning Alliance, recalled her own learning experience as she realized the impact of the Academy.

“In primary school I was good at everything except mathematics. I didn’t have anybody to realize this and know how to assist me,” Gidado said. “With this kind of information, teachers will be able to perform better and increase student performance.”

The Science in Action Day, which was co-designed by the CTTL and researchers at the Science of Learning Institute at Johns Hopkins, gave participants the chance to learn first-hand about educational research being conducted in 16 different labs.

“My job is to support people on the front lines, and teachers are on the front lines,” said Dr. Ashley Berner, a Johns Hopkins researcher who discussed the impact of school culture on students' academic and civic outcomes. “Sharing ideas with teachers is a privilege, and that’s where it counts. What they do matters, and the research bears that out.”

“I always enjoy talking to people outside of academia. I think it’s important for us to share what we’re learning,” said Dr. Mike McCloskey, who shared his work studying deficits in visual perception, reading, spelling, and memory in children and adults. “They often have very interesting perspectives and experiences. I often learn more from them than they do from me.”

With teachers and school leaders coming from public, public-charter, private schools, and more, including Teach for America (DC Region) and the internationally recognized Discovery Learning Alliance, participants said they could connect with diverse educators who share the same educational goals.

“To gain perspective from public and private schools, schools of all levels, really does broaden our skillset and benefits all of us,” said Jay Schill, Principal of Brunswick Middle School in Frederick. “There’s no problem that’s insurmountable. We may not have the answer yet, but we’ll get there collectively.”

Angelica Ayala ’18, a student intern with the Academy, said it was gratifying to be able to share her perspective with teachers and witness their commitment to growing as educators.

“I definitely learned to appreciate my teachers more, seeing they’re taking time out of their summer to come here and improve their teaching skills. You know each of them wants you to get better as a student,” Angelica said.

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The Hub features CTTL Academy's Science in Action Day
Jul
28
to Jul 29

The Hub features CTTL Academy's Science in Action Day

Johns Hopkins University's, The Hub, featured the Science in Action day, part of the CTTL's Science of Teaching and School Leadership Academy. 

Jill Rosen wrote: "Teachers get up-close view of what research about learning looks like. About 150 educators take part in first-ever Science in Action Day at Johns Hopkins.

Educators from as far away as Africa and as close as Baltimore got a deep dive Wednesday into Johns Hopkins University learning research.

About 150 secondary teachers and administrators spent the day on the university's Homewood campus for the first-ever Science in Action Day, sponsored by the university's Science of Learning Institute. They met scientists doing the cutting-edge research that could one day change how they teach.

"Teachers are very interested in scientific findings with potential classroom applications but never have a chance to see for themselves how researchers come to these conclusions," said Kristin Gagnier, outreach and evaluation specialist at the institute. "What does research about learning look like?""

Read the full story : https://hub.jhu.edu/2017/07/27/science-in-action-learning/

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Klingenstein Center's "Klingbrief" Features CTTL's Neuroteach
May
10
11:30 AM11:30

Klingenstein Center's "Klingbrief" Features CTTL's Neuroteach

The Klingenstein Center at Teachers College (Columbia University) monthly newsletter, "Klingbrief," featured in its April edition Neuoteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education. The book was co-authored by the CTTL's Director and Head of Research, Glenn Whitman and Ian Kelleher who have been presenting around the United States this year how research in the field of Mind, Brain, and Education Science can and should be used to inform, transform, and validate how teachers design their classes and work with each individual student. Check out the review here.  

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St. Andrew's and the CTTL Featured 3 Times in Independent School magazine
Mar
3
9:30 PM21:30

St. Andrew's and the CTTL Featured 3 Times in Independent School magazine

Not once or twice but three times in the spring (2017) issue of Independent School magazine was the work of St. Andrew's and its Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning mentioned. "Independent School provides people associated with private schools and those interested in following trends in all sectors of education with the independent school perspective on topics that range from school operations and administration to teaching and learning and working with parents, boards of trustees, and other volunteers. It has been the premier publication in private education for more than 60 years."  

"I am not sure if three mentions in one issue is a record for a school but it has to be close" said Glenn Whitman, Director of the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning who also said that, "I am always looking forward to reading Independent School and learning about innovations in other schools across the country, so it is great to share our work in this issue. 

If you can get your hands or eyes on a paper or electronic version of this issue with the theme of "The Innovation-Education Continuum," you will find the Chief Innovation Officer of NAIS listing Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education in a side-bar on "What Tim Fish is . . ."  Neuroteach was written by St. Andrew's teachers and in part tells the story of how St. Andrew's has used research in Mind, Brain, and Education Science to validate, inform, and transform teaching and learning in its Preschool through 12th grade classes. An excerpt from Neuroteach, titled "Teachers Are Researchers" was also included in this issue as was a piece titled "Brain Research, Teaching, and Learning" that highlighted the role the CTTL plays in the daily lives of St. Andrew's teachers and its winning of the International Mind, Brain, and Education Science Society's "Mission Award." 

The magic number three also carried over to how many different session St. Andrew's teachers facilitated or co-facilitated at the March 2017 NAIS conference in Baltimore. Throughout the two-day conference, St. Andrew's design thinking program was on display in the NAIS Maker Space and three sessions, titled "Stressed-Out Students Are the New Normal:  How Educators Can Alleviate Anxiety, "Brain Science and the Future of Teacher and School Leader Training" and "Research as Inspiration: Mind, Brain, and Education Science as a Driver for School Innovation" included St. Andrew's teachers as lead facilitators. 

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"Bringing Mind, Brain, and Education Science Webinar" features CTTL director Glenn Whitman
Jan
12
2:00 PM14:00

"Bringing Mind, Brain, and Education Science Webinar" features CTTL director Glenn Whitman

CTTL director Glenn Whitman, co-author of Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education was invited by The Alliance for Excellent Education to share the experience and research of the CTTL during the Alliance's "Bringing Mind, Brain, and Education Science to the Classroom" webinar. The Alliance is a Washington, DC–based national policy, practice, and advocacy organization "dedicated to ensuring that all students, particularly those who are traditionally undeserved, graduate from high school ready for success in college, work, and citizenship." The webinar was a reunion of sorts. The host of the webinar, Abner Oakes, is a former St. Andrew's teacher who currently the Director of Outreach and Strategic Partnerships for Policy to Practice for the Alliance. To view the 60-minute webinar click here.

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The CTTL Shares Stage with Leading Education Thinkers and Futurists
Oct
24
3:30 PM15:30

The CTTL Shares Stage with Leading Education Thinkers and Futurists

Glenn Whitman (@gwhitmancttl), Director of the CTTL, joined big thinkers to consider the future of great teaching and great schools at the Mount Vernon Presbyterian School’s Night of Inquiry, Innovation, and Impact in Atlanta, Georgia on October 20, 2016. The conference united six education leaders and cutting-edge cellist Okorie Johnson (@okcello1) for a deep dive exploration of education in the modern world.

The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning (@thecttl)’s main message was simple: although the organ of learning is the brain, teachers, school leaders, students, and policymakers are not using Mind, Brain, and Education Research enough to inform the design of schools or classroom instruction. By ensuring that 100% of St. Andrew’s teachers have training and ongoing professional development in how the brain learns, works, and thrives, St. Andrew’s serves as a replicable model of Mind, Brain, and Education science research-informed teaching.

The night also provided an opportunity to share the emerging development of the CTTL’s Mind, Brain, and Education Science Research Engagement Framework. A first-of-its kind professional growth tool, the Framework has been called “the most innovative thinking in how to bring MBE research at scale to educators regardless of school type or geographic location.”

 

Three generative questions drove the night’s presentations:

  1. How might we make school more reflective of real life?

  2. How might we empower learners to be seekers and explorers?

  3. How might we inspire one another-and the larger world-through the work to be undertaken at MVPS and beyond?

 

Glenn Whitman, the Director of The CTTL was able to share the work of St. Andrew’s and The CTTL alongside that of High Tech High’s Kaleb Rashad (@kalebrashad -Director of the Gary & Jerri-Ann Jacobs High Tech High School), Kawai Lai (@kawai_lai -Vice President of Education Technology and Learning Services at the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)), Grant Lichtman (@GrantLichtman -Educational Transformation Consultant and author of #EdJourney), Joyelle Harris (Director of the Engineering for Social Innovation Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology), and Tod Martin (CEO of Unboundary and TEDx Atlanta Organizer). Each presenter had the audience laughing and stretching their thinking.

The Night of Inquiry, Innovation, and Impact addressed the current opportunities and challenges of educators, who must consider how to provide an education that is designed with the brain in mind. Students deserve educators who understand how the brain learns and thrives in today’s connected, competitive, collaborative and constantly changing society. To learn more about how the night’s presenters grappled with this challenge, visit: MVIFI - A Night of Inquiry, Innovation

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Neuroteach Featured in Bethesda Magazine
Oct
23
9:30 AM09:30

Neuroteach Featured in Bethesda Magazine

Neuroteach was one of four books featured in Bethesda Magazine's "Book Report" for the November/December issue. Author of the "Book Report" Caralee Adams writes,  "It is full of practical ideas, such as designing class with the understanding that what students recall the most takes place in the first part of class and in the closing minutes."

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CTTL is the winner of the 2016 International Mind, Brain, and Education Science Mission Award
Sep
16
9:00 PM21:00

CTTL is the winner of the 2016 International Mind, Brain, and Education Science Mission Award

The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning was honored in Toronto on Friday morning with the Mission Award from the International Mind, Brain and Education Society.

Glenn Whitman, Director of the CTTL and a 20-year faculty member at St. Andrew’s where he is Dean of Studies and teaches History, and Dr. Ian Kelleher, the CTTL’s Head of Research and a 15-year faculty member at St. Andrew’s where he teaches Science, were named as individual recipients of the honor.

The CTTL was presented with the Award for Exemplifying the Mission of the International Mind, Brain and Education Society. The CTTL’s mission is to create and innovate in the field of Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) Science to allow teachers to maximize their effectiveness and students to achieve their highest potential.

The Center’s work can be seen every day in the St. Andrew’s classrooms as teachers integrate the latest in MBE Science into their practice. Whether it’s helping students become high achievers, helping high achievers complete their school work sooner so they have more time to pursue interests, or making sure play and hands-on learning are part of the Lower School experience, the CTTL has had a deep impact on all St. Andrew’s students.

The CTTL also annually trains teachers at other schools, both regionally and nationally, as it serves a public interest as well. Last year, the CTTL won an Educational Leadership Grantfrom the EE Ford Foundation. Just this summer, Whitman and Kelleher co-authored the book Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education, which can be purchased on Amazon. On Nov. 16, they will be hosting a book discussion, along with fellow St. Andrew’s author Ginger Cobb (who co-authored Sex, Drugs, and the S.A.T.: Getting out of High School and Getting in to College). 

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CTTL Faculty Member and SAES Teachers Featured in The Stanford Social Enterprise Review
Sep
1
9:30 AM09:30

CTTL Faculty Member and SAES Teachers Featured in The Stanford Social Enterprise Review

The International Development and Social Enterprise Class at St. Andrew's is taught by Liz Kiingi, David Brandt and Chuck James. The class is featured in The Stanford Social Enterprise Review- published by Stanford University and features best practices in the field of business and education. 

The article, A Compass for Change in High School Curricula is a call for design-based problem solving in support of local and international communities. 

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SAES Teacher and CTTL Lower School Research Coordinator to be Recognized at the White House
Aug
29
11:00 AM11:00

SAES Teacher and CTTL Lower School Research Coordinator to be Recognized at the White House

Hilarie Hall, St. Andrew’s Lower School Science Teacher and the CTTL Lower School Research Coordinator, will be honored at the White House during the first week of September.

Hall, who was informed that she had been named a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST) in early March, will receive her award during a ceremony in just two weeks. President Obama traditionally attends the ceremony.

The award, which is presented annually to about 100 educators nationwide, is the nation’s highest honor for K-12 teachers of mathematics and science. Administered by the National Science Foundation (NSF) on behalf of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, the PAEMST program recognizes outstanding teachers for their contributions to the teaching and learning of mathematics and science. Each awardee will receive a citation signed by President Obama and a $10,000 award from NSF.

“This award means a lot of things to me; it's both humbling and motivating,” Hall said. “It means that I can represent our St. Andrew's community in an innovative way and bring many new ideas and experiences to our students. It means that I have access to a great national network of like-minded educators. It motivates me to continue to push myself to work harder and more creatively in my role as a teacher.”

“Since arriving at St. Andrew's Hilarie has been instrumental in moving forward our design thinking program at the Lower School and forging new initiatives across disciplines to expand the reach of science into all aspects of student learning,” said Jordan Love, Head of Lower School. “Her pedagogical approach is collaborative, multimodal, and builds upon a belief that all students have boundless potential and capacity to learn,” Love said. ”Hilarie models for the students and her colleagues a passion for teaching, the willingness to take advantage of all learning opportunities, and the value of working in community towards shared goals.”

Hall will blog about her trip to the White House and share photos through St. Andrew’s Instagram and Facebook pages. She will also share highlights of her trip with Lower School students at an assembly early in the school year.

You can follow Hall on Twitter (@HilarieHall) where she regularly tweets from the Lower School design classroom.

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CTTL & SAES Representatitives Attend Annual People of Color Conference
Dec
4
4:00 PM16:00

CTTL & SAES Representatitives Attend Annual People of Color Conference

In its continued committment to diversity training, St. Andrew's and the CTTL sent four employees to the 28th annual People of Color Conference(POCC).  In 2006, the NAIS board affirmed that the focus of the People of Color Conference be on “...providing a sanctuary and networking opportunity for people of color and allies in independent schools as we build and sustain inclusive school communities.”


For the second year, the CTTL served as a sponsor for the annual event which drew 4,300 independent school professionals together for general sessions with keynotes, dozens of practitioner-led workshops, extensive affinity group work, and dialogue sessions.

The conference delegates were: Dr. Yolanda Rolle, Math Teacher and CTTL Researcher, Chaplain Patricia Alexander, MS and US Chaplain and Religion and English Teacher, Edgar Reyes, Digital Media Teacher, and Danielle Collins MS and US Diversity Coordinator and Assistant Director of Communications.

PoCC, according to NAIS, equips educators at every level, from teachers to trustees, with knowledge, skills, and experiences to improve and enhance the interracial, interethnic, and intercultural climate in their schools, as well as the attending academic, social-emotional, and workplace performance outcomes for students and adults alike. 

POCC runs concurrently with the Student Diversity Leadership conference (SDLC).

 

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TIME MAGAZINE FEATURES CTTL RESEARCH STUDY
Aug
17
9:30 AM09:30

TIME MAGAZINE FEATURES CTTL RESEARCH STUDY

One year ago, St. Andrew’s students took part in a research study that their peers and teachers had a hand in creating. Working in partnership with researchers from Harvard Graduate School of Education that lead Research Schools International, The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning launched a study to discover how student happiness impacts motivation and academic achievement.

Now, the mainstream media is paying attention to the results of the study. Time Magazine highlighted it in their education section in a piece written by Dr. Christina Hinton and Lauren Schiller of Research Schools International, which connects researchers at Harvard Graduate School of Education with schools that value an innovative “research school” model. Schools like St. Andrew’s, which is one of just eight schools in the world to be invited to be part of Research Schools International.

The central questions of the study were: 1) How does happiness shape motivation and academic achievement at St. Andrew’s?; and 2) Which school factors support student happiness? Teachers and administrators at St. Andrew’s have long believed that happier students make for better students. That’s the reason those questions were selected by St. Andrew’s teachers as the first ones to ask as members of Research Schools International. Researchers from Harvard Graduate School of Education helped shape the questionnaire that was asked of the St. Andrew’s K-12 student body of which 94% (435 students) took part.

Results of the study revealed that, on average, students who reported being happier had higher grades. Specifically, a statistically significant correlation was found between happiness and students’ GPA from elementary school through high school. The study also found that the quality of students’ relationships with teachers and peers were a good predictor of their happiness.

“This research validates what so many teachers at St. Andrew’s intuitively knew, and now we have the data to affirm it,” said Glenn Whitman, Director of The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning and a national thought-leader on implementing neuroeducational research in the classroom. “The most effective environment for student learning is one where they are both happy and challenged.”

“Research shows that the best predictor of happiness is not income, gender religion or even health, but rather relationships,” said Dr. Hinton, lead researcher on the study. “St. Andrew’s provides a nurturing community that teaches students to build caring, supportive relationships. There is nothing more essential to students’ well being and happiness than this.”

Dr. Hinton will be visiting St. Andrew’s on September 2 and 3 as The Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning continues its research partnership with Research Schools International. Join us on September 3 for a presentation by Dr. Christina Hinton. The presentation will be held at St. Andrew's Episcopal School from 6:30-7:30. 

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Director of the CTTL, Glenn Whitman, and Dr. Ian Kelleher Travel to England
Jul
17
11:30 AM11:30

Director of the CTTL, Glenn Whitman, and Dr. Ian Kelleher Travel to England

This past June, Glenn Whitman, Director of the CTTL and Dr. Ian Kelleher, Associate Director for Research and Programming, travelled to England to participate in the Sunday Times Festival of Education. They also spent time traveling through England to meet with and to learn from others who were equally passionate to enhance teacher quality, student achievement, and the schooling experience for all student. Learn more about their trip and what they learned in England on our blog

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Research Study featured by Deseret News National
May
18
1:00 PM13:00

Research Study featured by Deseret News National

The research study completed a few month ago by CTTL faculty and Researchers from Harvard's Graduate School of Education was featured by the Deseret News National. The study, which is the first of its kind, has begun to gain national attention. The study shows that happiness plays a critical role in learning. Read about the study and our partnership with Harvard's Graduate School of Education here

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CTTL/Research Schools International Study Garnering Media Interest
Mar
30
2:00 PM14:00

CTTL/Research Schools International Study Garnering Media Interest

A few months ago, St. Andrew’s completed a research study with researchers from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. This study, the first of its kind, showed that happiness plays a critical role in learning. Now, the study is beginning to gain a higher profile. Just this week, the Harvard Gazette featured a piece on the study, which affirms the long-held belief by St. Andrew’s teachers and administrators – that you don’t have to be miserable to get a good education.

In fact, quite the opposite is true, which is why St. Andrew’s intentionality when it comes to keeping students happy is so crucial to preparing our students for college and life.

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ST. ANDREW'S K-12 STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN A RESEARCH PROJECT
Feb
3
3:00 PM15:00

ST. ANDREW'S K-12 STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN A RESEARCH PROJECT

ST. ANDREW'S K-12 STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN a research project that is part of the CTTL's partnership with Research Schools International that is led by researchers from Harvard's Graduate School of Education.

For the second consecutive year, St. Andrew's students learned about the scientific method while participating in a research study designed by St. Andrew's teachers, students, and Harvard Graduate School of Education Researchers. Find out more about this cutting edge research study for the St. Andrew's community by reading these Frequently Asked Questions.

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Foreign Language Department Hosts Teach for America (TFA) faculty for a “Department Open House"
Jan
23
3:00 PM15:00

Foreign Language Department Hosts Teach for America (TFA) faculty for a “Department Open House"

St. Andrew's Foreign Language teachers welcomed ten Teach For America corps members to both the Postoak and Village campuses looking to see what excellent foreign language teaching and learning looks like. This is the 5th year of this program in which St. Andrew's teachers delivered small workshops on different topics such as assessments, grading rubrics, and class design to TFA corps members who want to enhance the quality of their Foreign Language instruction.

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Director of the CTTL and St. Andrew's Student Featured on CAP "Cognitive Science Revolution" Panel
Oct
29
9:30 AM09:30

Director of the CTTL and St. Andrew's Student Featured on CAP "Cognitive Science Revolution" Panel

On October 29, the Center for American Progress hosted the Cognitive Science Revolution Forum. The Panel discussed ways in which findings from cognitive science can be applied in the classroom to improve teaching and learning. Implications for federal, state, and local policy was also discussed. Learn more about the event and watch a video of the panelists here

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2013-2014 CTTL/Research School Student Fellows Named
Jan
16
3:30 PM15:30

2013-2014 CTTL/Research School Student Fellows Named

Glenn Whitman, the Director of the CTTL, and Robert Kosasky, St. Andrew's Head of School, announced the six students selected as the CTTL/Research School Student Fellows.

The following six students were selected as the CTTL/Research School Student Fellows for this school year:

10th grade: Gabi Gedo, Bobby Radecki, Zoe, Gray

11th grade: Michael McDonnell-Diaz, Danny Knauss

12th grade: Brian Bies

The student research fellows will play a critical role in the in the study design, data collection, and the dissemination of results. The research study will be done as part of the CTTL’s partnership with the Research Schools International that is led by Harvard Graduate School of Education researchers.

The group had the opportunity to work with the Faculty Fellows and Harvard professors on Thursday from 11:30-1:00pm.

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