Creating Innovators Through Design Thinking
Jun
18
to Jun 20

Creating Innovators Through Design Thinking

If creative thought begins with a child’s very first acts of curiosity, exploration and play, why is this impulse lost?

The world needs innovation. By providing a way solve problems, design thinking is the nexus between learning, feeling and making. The human capacity to create and innovate is alive in any person willing to search, question, tinker and invent the future. Come learn how to welcome students into this process.  This three-day seminar explores the instructional philosophy, tools and activities that nurture essential innovative thinking. This workshop develops the different strategies and skills necessary to build creative, collaborative, and design-minded classrooms and design thinking spaces. In St. Andrew’s D!Lab facility, participants will explore the tools, CAD software and machines (3D, Milling and Laser Systems) that take design thinking across all ages and into all realms of curricula.  

Great minds are born not simply of rote knowledge but from the continuous habit of curiosity. One essential job of educators is to provide the space and program for designing the future world students will live in as citizens. This requires minds that lead with ingenuity.

This workshop offers teachers of all ages and experience a powerful and persuasive way of teaching.

Fees include materials and daily breakfast and lunch.

Facilitator: Charles (Chuck) James is an educator and curriculum development specialist in science and design thinking education. Chuck’s instructional work in design thinking, technology, and innovation, includes creating curricula for The National Science Foundation, NASA, The American Geologic Institute, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and the American Chemical Society.  James was twice awarded the state-level Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics for the District of Columbia and The Congressional Black Caucus has recognized him for his contributions to science and mathematics education and his focus on at-risk students. Chuck is the Director of the D!Lab at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School (@SAESDLab).

Register here

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Teaching All Kinds Of Minds: The Principles and Strategies of Neuroeducation 2018
Jun
18
to Jun 20

Teaching All Kinds Of Minds: The Principles and Strategies of Neuroeducation 2018

Now in its sixth year, the Teaching All Kinds of Minds Workshop, for K-12 educators and school leaders, approaches the science of teaching and learning through academic themes (e.g., listening, speaking, reading and writing) and provides tools and activities for next-day classroom use.

Participants develop an understanding for the All Kinds of Minds Neurodevelopmental Framework for Learning (NDFL) that was revised in 2016 to reflect the most current research in Mind, Brain, and Education Science research. Each module over this three-day workshop helps participants practice applying the language and framework of All Kinds of Minds to the demands of specific academic skills placed on each student's learning brain.

One of the key outcomes of this workshop is that each participant will have a framework and language to inform how they design their classes and work with each individual student and evaluate each student’s current learning strengths and weaknesses.

This workshop is facilitated by the co-authors of Neuroteach and teachers from St. Andrew’s Episcopal where 100% of the Pre-school through 12th grade faculty have been trained in the All Kinds of Minds program.

Register here

Faculty: 

·       Dr. Ian Kelleher is the coauthor of Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education and Head of Research for the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning. He grew up in Cambridge, England and went to the University of Manchester as an undergraduate where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in geochemistry. He returned to Cambridge as a Ph.D. student at the University of Cambridge, Churchill College, working in the Department of Earth Science. Ian teaches chemistry, physics and robotics, as well as coaches boy’s JV soccer. Ian also co-facilitates the CTTL”s “Creating Innovators through Design Thinking” workshop and is responsible for the CTTL’s Teacher and Student Research Fellowship Program.

·       Susheela Robinson is the Head of the English Department at St. Andrew's Episcopal School. Susheela Robinson joined St. Andrews in 2006 as a 6th and 7th grade English teacher. Her career in education has included teaching in places from South Dakota to the Virgin Islands. Most recently she taught at an all girls school in Greenwich, Connecticut for eight years, the sister school to Stone Ridge. She earned her B.A. at Hope College, in Holland, Michigan and her M. Ed. at Plymouth State College, in New Hampshire. She lives in Reston, VA with her husband and enjoys reading, cooking, and long walks.

·       Glenn Whitman is the coauthor of Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education and directs the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning (@thecttl) at St. Andrew's Episcopal School. Glenn is a former Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence Fellow and author of Dialogue with the Past: Engaging Students and Meeting Standards through Oral History as well as co-editor of Think Differently and Deeply, the national publication of the CTTL. Glenn is also a blogger for Edutopia. Glenn earned his MALS from Dartmouth College and a BA from Dickinson College. Follow Glenn @gwhitmancttl or email him at gwhitman@saes.org.

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National Diversity Practitioners Institute
Jun
25
to Jun 27

National Diversity Practitioners Institute

Designed specifically for diversity practitioners, the 3-day program will:

  • engage participants with interactive sessions that will deepen core knowledge around diversity, identity, and inclusion 
  • provide a framework for developing and implementing trusted practices
  • give members an opportunity to plan their diversity efforts at their school with support from institute faculty throughout the year in a formal mentoring program
  • promote networking and resource sharing among members  


This conference is not meant solely for diversity directors.
NDPI is for practitioners - anyone who wishes to aid the building and sustaining of inclusive school communities. 
 

Last year, we had among our group diversity directors, deans, admissions directors, teachers, curriculum coordinators, division heads, and assistant heads of school. 

Learn More: http://www.diversitypractitioners.org/

Institute Facilitators:
Rodney Glasgow (Institute Chair)- Chair, NAIS Student Diversity Leadership Conference and Head of Middle School, St. Andrew's Episcopal School
John Gentile- Educational Consultant
Diane Nichols- Director of Diversity and Student Leadership, Worcester Academy
Toni Graces Williamson- Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Abington Friends School
Rohan Arjun- Asst. Director of Admission, St. Mark's School
Yvonne Adams- Director of Diversity, St. Stephen's Episcopal School

Register Here

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The Science Of Teaching & School Leadership Academy
Jul
22
to Jul 26

The Science Of Teaching & School Leadership Academy

Each year, the Academy will bring up to 150 traditional public, public-charter and independent school teachers and leaders to the Washington, DC region for a five-day intensive, and fun, immersion into Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) Science research-informed teaching and learning. Academy participants will then receive year-round mentoring and must commit to participate in a longitudinal study designed by university researchers. The study will measure how the professional development experience of Academy participants impacts teacher efficacy, pedagogical practice, student achievement, and long-term commitment to the teaching profession. Through the Academy, the CTTL aims to help teachers and school leaders use the growing body of educational neuroscience to inform the design of their schools and classrooms. The CTTL’s goal is for all students— regardless of zip code or school type— to learn and develop with the guidance of a teacher who knows the research behind how his or her brain works, learns, and changes. 

 

Learn more here

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Parent Night School
Nov
16
6:30 PM18:30

Parent Night School

Experience the exceptional teaching that St. Andrew's students enjoy every day by going back to school for one night. This is your opportunity to take two thirty-minute classes from some of St. Andrew's finest teachers. There will be no tests, papers, or homework: just the chance to learn and interact with the same teachers your child gets to work with each day. Refreshments and babysitting will be provided free of charge for attendees.

Registration fee is $20 per person and $30 for two guests- bring a friend! Registration fee covers compensation for Night School Teachers.

Schedule:

6:30-7:00pm    Welcome back to school: Mingle with Your Teachers

7:00-7:15pm    First Period: Neuroscience 101 with Glenn Whitman, Director of the CTTL, and Ian Kelleher, CTTL Head of Research.

7:15-7:45pm    Second Period: First class of your choice

7:45-8:15pm    Third Period: Second class of your choice

8:15pm            Dismissal

 

Offerings:

The Science of Learning Led by Christine Lewis

Debating Hiroshima Led by Alex Haight

The Building Blocks of The Brain Led by Andrew Seidman

The Power of Asking Questions Led by Sung Hee Kim

Learning by Design Led by Hilarie Hall and Chuck James

Greetings in Mandarin Led by Sara Graham

Religion and Faith Through Our Own Eyes Led by Rodney Glasgow

Your Brain on Ukulele Led by Amy Wooley


 

Class Descriptions and Teacher Bios

The Science of Learning : Led by Christine Lewis

Class Description: MBE science is the collective body of research and theory from neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and education. Why is this important to a fourth grader? What is relevant to a fourth grader? And how are the salient findings taught in a fourth-grade classroom? I will answer these questions by leading you through an interactive lesson exploring the function of the Reticular Activating System as it would be taught in my own classroom. In doing so, I aim to introduce you to one of the many research-informed approaches used at St. Andrew’s to empower students through knowledge.

Teacher Biography:
Christine Lewis grew up in Wellington, New Zealand. Completing a BS in Chemistry at Waikato University, Hamilton, NZ and a MS in the Science of Instruction at Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA after emigrating in 2003. She began her teaching career 30 years ago, however, her early years in the USA were spent coaching field hockey, dance team, and track while teaching part time in the elementary grades. During Christine’s 11 years with St. Andrew’s, she taught kindergarten through fourth grade. She is also a Responsive Classroom® national consulting teacher, MBE science facilitator for the CTTL in their Teach-for-America collaborative program, and regular contributing writer for the CTTL “Think Differently and Deeply” publication.

Debating Hiroshima: Led by Alex Haight

Class Description:

Few topics have elicited as emotional a response as the decision to use the atomic bomb in Hiroshima. In fact, the many protests and controversies surrounding the 50th anniversary in 1995 highlighted the emotional gravity of the decision. In this course, you will examine the conventional reasons and justifications for the decision through primary sources and thought-provoking testimonies. In doing so, you will experience how students in AP US History learn about controversial historical events through discussion and debate.

Teacher Biography: Alex has been teaching history at St. Andrew's for 20 years, including AP US History, Race Matters, and Current Events, to name a few.  It is also Alex’s 22nd year coaching boys soccer at St. Andrew’s.

The Building Blocks Of The Brain: Led by Andrew Seidman

Class Description: Psychology prompts some deep questions about how exactly we interact with the world around us. What exactly is actually happening inside our head when we feel a hand on our shoulder? What is going on in our brain when we decide to raise our hand? How is it that the brain experiences sadness? Can we actually see when the brain learns something? This course will seek to begin to answer these and other questions. Using kinesthetic exercises, mnemonics, and other strategies, this class will help you to increase your understanding of neurons, the nervous system, and parts of the brain.

 

Teacher Biography: Andrew Seidman has been a Psychology and English teacher for twelve years. He holds a Bachelor’s degree in English and Psychology from Washington University in St. Louis, a master’s degree in English and American Literature from Pennsylvania State University, and a master of professional studies degree in Clinical Psychological Science from the University of Maryland.  His article, “Breaking the Frozen Sea: Building Social Cognition Through Reading and Writing” is due out in this year’s edition of Think Differently and Deeply (2018). He is faculty proctor for St. Andrew’s Creative Writing magazine, Creaturae, and a current CTTL faculty fellow.

The Power of Asking Question Led by Sung Hee Kim

Class description: What is the value of asking questions?  How important is it to our own learning?  What is the connection between making knowledge and asking questions? And how does social emotional learning fit into it all? In this class, students will participate in an exercise that addresses these questions.  Then we will step outside of the exercise to be metacognitive, examining our own learning process and its connection to design thinking.

Teacher biography:  Sung Hee Kim currently teaches first grade at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School.  She has been working in the field of education for 15 years.  Nine of these were spent at St. Andrew’s where she has taught pre-k, kindergarten and first grade.  She received a B.A. from Wellesley College, MA in Philosophy and an M.A. in Journalism from New York University, NY.  She is the author of “Lower School Design Thinking” published in the June 2017 issue of the St. Andrew’s Spring Magazine, “The Differentiated Classroom: An Elementary School Perspective published in Think Differently and Deeply Volume 2, and “The Stone of Knowledge” which is due to be published in the next issue of Thing Differently and Deeply Volume 3.

Learning By Design Led by Hilarie Hall and Chuck James

Class description:  Design thinking is a process used by learners of all ages to solve complex problems.  It requires foresight, imagination, organization, cooperation, and empathy.  This Night School class will feature a human-centered design activity that will help demonstrate how St. Andrew's students work, each day, as innovative problem solvers.

Teacher Biographies:

Chuck James is an educator and curriculum specialist in Science and Design Education. He is the Director of the D!Lab Design Thinking Program as well as the Co- Director of Service Learning at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in Potomac, Maryland.  Chuck’s instructional work in Design, Technology, and Innovation includes creating curricula for The National Science Foundation, NASA, The American Geologic Institute, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and the American Chemical Society. James was twice awarded the state-level Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics. He was recognized in 2001 by The Congressional Black Caucus for his contributions to science and mathematics education and his focus on work with at-risk students. In 2012, he was also honored by the Maryland General Assembly for his work with at-risk populations in Maryland. Chuck’s publications include- Thinking is a Field Trip. Carnegie Press (2004), Design Connections, National Science Foundation. (1999). Chuck's new book, Guide to Imagination is set for release in October 2017.  He holds an EdM in Education from George Mason University.

Hilarie Hall has been a classroom teacher for the past ten years, specializing in early elementary education.  She currently teaches science to St. Andrew's youngest learners from preschool through second grade.  Hilarie is a 2014 recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching (PAEMST) and has received grants for Voya, Toshiba America, and Pitsco to develop new curriculum.  She guides the Lower School's First Lego Robotics team and works as the CTTL Lower School Research Coordinator.  She has a B.S. in finance from Boston College and an M.A. in Early Elementary Education from American University.  She is also a proud parent of two St. Andrew's students.

Greetings in Mandarin Led by Sara Graham

Class Description: Studies show that Mandarin Chinese is one of the most difficult languages for native speakers of English to learn.  Why is it so difficult?  Does it have to be difficult?  What are some innovative study methods one can use to ease the transition into learning this language?  Students can expect to answer these questions, and more, in Greetings in Mandarin.  Students will learn how to exchange culturally appropriate greetings and will also explore unique and exciting ways to learn this important language.

Teacher Biography: Sara has been working in the field of education for ten years..  She has held a variety of positions, including: associate director of admissions, curriculum resource teacher, curriculum developer, and teacher of Asian history, global history and Mandarin Chinese. Sara moved to the Washington, D.C. area from Honolulu, Hawaii, where she developed and coordinated a K-6 after-school Mandarin immersion program for Punahou School while also teaching at the high school level. Sara has a B.A. from Lawrence University in East Asian Languages and Cultures, and an M.A. in Teaching Foreign Language (Mandarin Chinese) from The Middlebury Institute of International Studies in Monterey, California.  Contact Sara at sgraham@saes.org.

Religion and Faith Through Our Own Eyes Led by Rodney Glasgow

Class Description:

What is religion? What is faith? Who or what is God? What does it mean to be religious? These essential questions will be the basis of exploration through the students’ lived experiences of religion and faith.  Through dialogue and structured exchange methods, students will be able to unpack their own personal narratives with religion and faith while learning from the narratives of other students.  Together, we will deepen our shared understanding of religion and faith and how it shapes our individual and collective lives.    

Teacher Biography: Rodney Glasgow is the Head of Middle School and Chief Diversity Officer at St. Andrew’s.  He teaches Religion 6: The Hebrew Bible and the Nature of God.  He holds a B.A. from Harvard University in Afro-American Studies and Psychology and an M.A. from Columbia University in Private School Leadership.  He is the Chair of the NAIS Student Diversity Leadership Conference and founder and Chair of the National Diversity Directors Institute.

Your Brain on Ukulele Led by Amy Wooley

Class Description: We have long understood that music makes us more human. Recently, driven by lots of stunning research, the conversation has moved to how music makes us smarter humans in every way: emotionally, socially, physically and intellectually. This is especially true if we humans learn music at a young age, when the brain is at its most plastic. Playing a musical instrument is like “a full-body workout for the brain.” So, why the ukulele? The answer is simple yet deep. Ukulele is a real instrument that is popular, inexpensive, accessible, and leads to other instruments. Learning it involves reading notation, tablature, chord symbols, and scale patterns. It plays both melody and chords, and coordinated activities like singing and playing, as well as ensemble playing, are possible.  In this class you will go from zero-to-ukulele in 30 minutes. So, come get a workout for your brain, and enjoy the fun of playing music with other humans!

Teacher Biography:

Amy Wooley has been a music educator for over twenty years, teaching all ages from pre-K through graduate students. Dr. Wooley holds master’s and doctorate degrees in ethnomusicology from UCLA.  She also holds a bachelor’s degree in music composition from UCLA and a degree in scoring for motion pictures and television from USC. She is a composer and arranger, and former recording artist on MCA, with a nomination by the Academy of Country Music for Best New Female Vocalist.  She has presented at several conferences, including “Your Brain on Music” at the 2012 AIMS Annual Conference and “Your Brain on Ukulele” at the 2014 Scholar Search Associates/CTTL Forum. A current CTTL fellow, she is the co-author of  “Arts Integration” in Think Differently and Deeply (2102) and author of “Your Brain on Ukulele” in This Differently and Deeply II (2102).

 

 

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CTTL Presenting at researchED NYC
Oct
7
8:00 AM08:00

CTTL Presenting at researchED NYC

Join researchED, the international grassroots ed-improvement movement, in Brooklyn, NY, for a high-paced day of professional learning and networking. Hear from and exchange ideas with world-class educational thought-leaders on a diverse range of evidence-supported improvement topics, from reading instruction to overall school improvement to cognitive science to the state of ed reform in the US and beyond.

Date: Saturday, 7 October 2017

Venue: Achievement First Brooklyn High/Uncommon Charter High School, 1485 Pacific Street, Brooklyn NY

Scheduled to Appear: Morgan Polikoff, Karin Chenoweth, Derrell Bradford, Kate Walsh, Ben Riley, Mark Seidenberg, Tom Bennett, Yana Weinstein, Megan Smith, Ian Kelleher & Glenn Whitman, Lucy Crehan, Eric Kalenze, Pedro de Bruyckere, David Steiner, Bondo Nyembwe, Andy Sachariason & Jon Gutierrez, Katharine Beals, Cara Jackson, Natalie Wexler & Sherry Lewkowicz (The Writing Revolution), Chris Weiss (US Institute of Education Sciences), Matt Barnum, Efrat Furst, Richard Phelps, and John Mighton

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Cleverlands: What America Can Learn from the World's Most Successful School Systems
Oct
2
4:30 PM16:30

Cleverlands: What America Can Learn from the World's Most Successful School Systems

Cleverlands: What America Can Learn from the World's Most Successful School Systems- The CTTL will host Lucy Crehan, author of Cleverlands: The Secrets Behind the Success of the World's Education Superpowers, on Monday, October 2nd. Lucy's firsthand, international experience researching what makes for great teachers and schools in Finland, Japan, Singapore, Shanghai, and Canada. Korea provides an important perspective for teachers, school leaders, and policymakers considering the future of education in the United States. For tickets and more information, click hereThis event is free for St. Andrew's community members (employees, parents, students, and alumni).

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The Science Of Teaching & School Leadership Academy
Jul
23
to Jul 27

The Science Of Teaching & School Leadership Academy

      Each year, the Academy will bring up to 150 traditional public, public-charter and independent school teachers and leaders to the Washington, DC region for a five-day intensive, and fun, immersion into Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) Science research-informed teaching and learning. Academy participants will then receive year-round mentoring and must commit to participate in a longitudinal study designed by university researchers. The study will measure how the professional development experience of Academy participants impacts teacher efficacy, pedagogical practice, student achievement, and long-term commitment to the teaching profession. Through the Academy, the CTTL aims to help teachers and school leaders use the growing body of educational neuroscience to inform the design of their schools and classrooms. The CTTL’s goal is for all students— regardless of zip code or school type— to learn and develop with the guidance of a teacher who knows the research behind how his or her brain works, learns, and changes. 

 

Learn more here

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National Diversity Practitioners Institute
Jun
26
to Jun 28

National Diversity Practitioners Institute

Designed specifically for diversity practitioners, the 3-day program will:

  • engage participants with interactive sessions that will deepen core knowledge around diversity, identity, and inclusion 
  • provide a framework for developing and implementing trusted practices
  • give members an opportunity to plan their diversity efforts at their school with support from institute faculty throughout the year in a formal mentoring program
  • promote networking and resource sharing among members  


This conference is not meant solely for diversity directors.
NDPI is for practitioners - anyone who wishes to aid the building and sustaining of inclusive school communities. 
 

Last year, we had among our group diversity directors, deans, admissions directors, teachers, curriculum coordinators, division heads, and assistant heads of school. 

Learn More: http://www.diversitypractitioners.org/

Institute Facilitators:
Rodney Glasgow (Institute Chair)- Chair, NAIS Student Diversity Leadership Conference and Head of Middle School, St. Andrew's Episcopal School
John Gentile- Educational Consultant
Diane Nichols- Director of Diversity and Student Leadership, Worcester Academy
Toni Graces Williamson- Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Abington Friends School
Rohan Arjun- Asst. Director of Admission, St. Mark's School
Yvonne Adams- Director of Diversity, St. Stephen's Episcopal School

Register Here

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Teaching All Kinds Of Minds: The Principles and Strategies of Neuroeducation
Jun
19
to Jun 21

Teaching All Kinds Of Minds: The Principles and Strategies of Neuroeducation

Now in its fifth year, the Teaching All Kinds of Minds Workshop, for K-12 educators and school leaders, approaches the science of teaching and learning through academic themes (e.g., listening, speaking, reading and writing) and provides tools and activities for next-day classroom use.

Participants develop an understanding for the All Kinds of Minds Neurodevelopmental Framework for Learning (NDFL) that was revised in 2016 to reflect the most current research in Mind, Brain, and Education Science research. Each module over this three-day workshop helps participants practice applying the language and framework of All Kinds of Minds to the demands of specific academic skills placed on each student's learning brain.

One of the key outcomes of this workshop is that each participant will have a framework and language to inform how they design their classes and work with each individual student and evaluate each student’s current learning strengths and weaknesses.

This workshop is facilitated by the co-authors of Neuroteach and teachers from St. Andrew’s Episcopal where 100% of the Pre-school through 12th grade faculty have been trained in the All Kinds of Minds program.

Register here

Faculty: 

·       Dr. Ian Kelleher is the coauthor of Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education and Head of Research for the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning. He grew up in Cambridge, England and went to the University of Manchester as an undergraduate where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in geochemistry. He returned to Cambridge as a Ph.D. student at the University of Cambridge, Churchill College, working in the Department of Earth Science. Ian teaches chemistry, physics and robotics, as well as coaches boy’s JV soccer. Ian also co-facilitates the CTTL”s “Creating Innovators through Design Thinking” workshop and is responsible for the CTTL’s Teacher and Student Research Fellowship Program.

·       Susheela Robinson is the Head of the English Department at St. Andrew's Episcopal School. Susheela Robinson joined St. Andrews in 2006 as a 6th and 7th grade English teacher. Her career in education has included teaching in places from South Dakota to the Virgin Islands. Most recently she taught at an all girls school in Greenwich, Connecticut for eight years, the sister school to Stone Ridge. She earned her B.A. at Hope College, in Holland, Michigan and her M. Ed. at Plymouth State College, in New Hampshire. She lives in Reston, VA with her husband and enjoys reading, cooking, and long walks.

·       Glenn Whitman is the coauthor of Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education and directs the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning (@thecttl) at St. Andrew's Episcopal School. Glenn is a former Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence Fellow and author of Dialogue with the Past: Engaging Students and Meeting Standards through Oral History as well as co-editor of Think Differently and Deeply, the national publication of the CTTL. Glenn is also a blogger for Edutopia. Glenn earned his MALS from Dartmouth College and a BA from Dickinson College. Follow Glenn @gwhitmancttl or email him at gwhitman@saes.org.

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Creating Innovators Through Design Thinking
Jun
19
to Jun 21

Creating Innovators Through Design Thinking

If creative thought begins with a child’s very first acts of curiosity, exploration and play, why is this impulse lost?

The world needs innovation. By providing a way solve problems, design thinking is the nexus between learning, feeling and making. The human capacity to create and innovate is alive in any person willing to search, question, tinker and invent the future. Come learn how to welcome students into this process.  This three-day seminar explores the instructional philosophy, tools and activities that nurture essential innovative thinking. This workshop develops the different strategies and skills necessary to build creative, collaborative, and design-minded classrooms and design thinking spaces. In St. Andrew’s D!Lab facility, participants will explore the tools, CAD software and machines (3D, Milling and Laser Systems) that take design thinking across all ages and into all realms of curricula.  

Great minds are born not simply of rote knowledge but from the continuous habit of curiosity. One essential job of educators is to provide the space and program for designing the future world students will live in as citizens. This requires minds that lead with ingenuity.

This workshop offers teachers of all ages and experience a powerful and persuasive way of teaching.

Fees include materials and daily breakfast and lunch.

Facilitator: Charles (Chuck) James is an educator and curriculum development specialist in science and design thinking education. Chuck’s instructional work in design thinking, technology, and innovation, includes creating curricula for The National Science Foundation, NASA, The American Geologic Institute, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and the American Chemical Society.  James was twice awarded the state-level Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics for the District of Columbia and The Congressional Black Caucus has recognized him for his contributions to science and mathematics education and his focus on at-risk students. Chuck is the Director of the D!Lab at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School (@SAESDLab).

Register here

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Diversity in the DMV- A Regional Student and Educator Conference
Feb
16
8:30 AM08:30

Diversity in the DMV- A Regional Student and Educator Conference

Student leaders and diversity advocates are invited to attend this regional student conference. The regional conference is designed for high school students to engage in activities that will develop their leadership skills and advocacy for diversity and inclusion programming in their schools. Participants will explore elements of their own identities as well as learning tools for cross-cultural understanding. The curriculum will be interactive and innovative, geared towards developing change agents. This could be a great follow up to SDLC 2016 or a way to connect with this work for those students who were unable to attend SDLC 2016. Adult chaperones will have the opportunity to participate in a day-long workshop, led by trained diversity leaders.

 *Please note that this conference is open to all high school students, including those that have and have not attended SDLC.

Register here

$55 Per Student (Lunch & Resources included)

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Intro to Four Dimensional Education Workshop for Educators
Jan
28
8:00 AM08:00

Intro to Four Dimensional Education Workshop for Educators

Overview:

Developing future ready students doesn't mean teaching students EVERYTHING; it means prioritizing what students learn so that it's as relevant as possible. Curriculum hasn’t evolved much since the 1800s. At the Center for Curriculum Redesign, we work with educators to rethink what students ought to be learning to be successful in the 21st century. Utilizing the 4DEdu design process we work with teachers to re-examine curriculum and uncover how they can transform traditional curricula into 4DEdu curricula.

Objectives:

  • Understand the ‘why’ and ‘what’ of curriculum redesign
  • Develop a deeper understanding of the ‘how’ of 4DEdu
  • Explore your own curriculum for relevance

Register Here!

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Director of the CTTL and Head of Research to Present at Learning & the Brain Conference
Nov
17
to Nov 19

Director of the CTTL and Head of Research to Present at Learning & the Brain Conference

On November 17-19, Glenn Whitman, Director of the CTTL and Dr. Ian Kelleher, Head of Research, will present as part of the Learning and the Brain Conference in Boston, MA. Together they will present on the topic of, "Mind, Brain and Education Research: Informed Pathways for Purposeful Teaching, Learning and Thinking".

To learn more about the Conference visit their website

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Starting Small, Thinking Big: Re-Imagining the Mathematics Curriculum
Jun
22
to Jun 23

Starting Small, Thinking Big: Re-Imagining the Mathematics Curriculum

Starting Small, Thinking Big: Re-Imagining the Mathematics Curriculum

One of the first and foremost duties of the teacher is not to give his students the impression that mathematical problems have little connection with each other, and no connection at all with anything else. We have a natural opportunity to investigate the connections of a problem when looking back at its solution.  – George Polya

Starting Small, Thinking Big

Date: June 22–23

Location: St. Andrew’s Episcopal School

Abstract

School mathematics does not exist in a vacuum. Rather school mathematics is a part of a larger connected mathematics story. We believe that the aim of instruction is to tell a mathematics story that embraces the natural connections across mathematical topics while simultaneously emphasizing the wonder of the mathematics in engaging ways. Much of the current research in mathematics education is centered about the notion of mathematics storytelling. This coupled with researchers’ interests in bridging research from brain science and mathematical instruction, will influence how practitioners go about telling these mathematical stories in their classrooms. Though the task of telling a simultaneously wonderful, engaging, and connected mathematics story is a difficult one, practitioners committed to re-imagining their pedagogical craft are persistent in their search of ways to make mathematical connections that empower their instruction and empower learners of mathematics.

Purpose of the Workshop

Our primary purpose in this workshop is to use seminal and current research findings from education and brain science to identify and tell a wonderful, engaging, and connected mathematics story.

Workshop Format

We will embark on the following activities throughout the workshop:

1.     Define what we mean by “wonderful, engaging, and connected mathematics story”.

2.     Explore the advantages and challenges of telling a connected mathematics story.

3.     Apply a working framework to identify “mathematical connections” in mathematics instruction.

4.     Analyze case studies and videos of mathematics instruction with the goal of identifying “mathematical connections”.

5.     Develop a series of 4-5 lessons from one unit that is wonderful, engaging, and connected.

6.     Share our constructed mathematical stories.

Preparing for the Workshop

1.     Bring a sample video of your teaching.

2.     Think about and come prepared to discuss the following question:

What would a wonderful, engaging, and connected mathematics story look like in your classroom?

3.     Read Mathematical Mindset by Jo Boaler. (To be provided)

4.     Read a collection of 4-5 research articles and book chapters in education.

Facilitators: 

Yolanda A. Rolle, PhD: Dr. Rolle currently teaches mathematics at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School.  Prior to her time at St. Andrew’s she taught at universities and schools in Massachusetts, Nebraska and Nassau Bahamas. Before arriving at St. Andrew’s she taught in Boston University’s School of Education. She has also worked as a researcher on multiple multi-year funded grants in mathematics education. Her primary research responsibilities involved research studies around the habits of mind for learning mathematics and conducting extended fieldwork in elementary and middle-school classrooms. Her primary research interest is to study classrooms and teachers who seek to nurture mathematical habits of mind in their students. Other research interests include teacher inquiry, research design and equity in mathematics education.

Karen Kaufman: Ms. Kaufman has a B.S. Degree from the University of Maryland and an M.B.A from the George Washington University. Before joining St. Andrew's, Ms. Kaufman worked in private industry as a business and law firm consultant. Since joining St. Andrew's ten years ago, Ms. Kaufman has taught middle and upper school mathematics, chaired and served on numerous St. Andrew's task forces, maintained an active role with the CTTL as a teacher fellow and author of the article 'Effort Matters Most', and is currently head of the mathematics department.

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Ideas in Education Festival 2016
Apr
16
9:00 AM09:00

Ideas in Education Festival 2016

What happens when the best teachers, school leaders, students, researchers and policy makers from all educational settings come together to imagine the future of our schools? Let’s find out.

This gathering will be part idea sharing, part data collecting, part networking, and part alliance building. It will also be fun. Most importantly, it will be about using the principles of human-centered design thinking to answer two questions:

✤ What do we already know about what is working in education today?
✤ How can we better incubate, share and leverage ideas that will transform teaching and learning for all students?

Register Here! 

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Nov
19
7:00 PM19:00

CTTL Night School

Thursday, November 19th

Postoak Campus: Lower Level Library

7:00 pm - 8:45pm

Experience what St. Andrew's students get to enjoy every day, exceptional teaching, by going back to school for one night. This is your opportunity to take two thirty-minute classes from some of St. Andrew's finest teachers. And get this, there will be no tests, papers, or homework, just the chance to learn and interact with those same teachers your child gets to work with each day. Please feel free to bring your friends and family along!

The cost is $25 per person with all proceeds benefitting the CTTL Innovative Teaching Grants Program! 

REGISTER HERE!

 

Schedule:

7:00-7:20pm    Welcome back to school: Meet Your Teachers

7:30-8:00pm    First Period

8:15-8:45pm    Second Period

8:45pm            Dismissal

Class Offerings

The Modern Relevance of the Civil War and Reconstruction  Led by Glenn Whitman

Greetings in Mandarin Led by Sara Graham

Design Thinking in Action Led by Hilarie Hall and Ian Kelleher

Writers Workshop: Become the Writer You Always Wanted to Be Led by Alyssa Morris

Religion and Faith Through Our Own Eyes Led by Rodney Glasgow

Your Brain on Ukulele Led by Amy Wooley

Mathematical Thinking: How a Pair of Rabbits Influenced Salvador Dali Led by Frank Wagner

 

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